Computational Creativity to Improve Computer Science Education for CS and non-CS Undergraduates (IUSE)

Computational Creativity to Improve Computer Science Education for CS and non-CS Undergraduates (IUSE)

The IUSE titled “Computational Creativity to Improve Computer Science Education for CS and non-CS Undergraduates” is an NSF funded project that aims to produce a suite of validated, high quality Computational Creativity Exercises (CCEs) and an associated computational creativity course. The project team carries out rigorous research to understand the efficacy of the CCEs, how that is affected by collaborative interactions and student learning processes, and the impact CCEs have on enrollment and retention in computer science (CS) and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses. CCEs is expected to provide an opportunity to creatively solve problems that require a CS principle without writing program code. The project team will expand the dissemination and implementation of the CCEs and gain increased understanding of the factors that influence efficacy of the exercises. In addition to dissemination of the exercises and project outcomes, and a workshop for interested faculty, the project impact will be further broadened because the resulting Computational Creativity Course can be delivered via distance education. In addition, the project team will update and enhance K-12 versions of the exercises that have been deployed on Google's Exploring Computational Thinking site. 

The Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Consortium (SBSRC) conducts an independent outside review of evaluation methods, data collection instruments, data analyses, and findings (drafted manuscripts and other grant related materials) and provides a report of review results and recommendations that is attached to the annual and final reports to NSF.

Contacts

Changsoo Song Research Assistant Professor

Mindy Anderson-Knott Director of Evaluation and Development